William Talbott



Professor for Practical Philosophy at the University of Washington

Resident at the Forschungskolleg Humanwissenschaften:
April‒May 2011, April‒June 2019

Research topic at the Forschungskolleg Humanwissenschaften:
»Complexity in Scientific Reasoning«

Research partner:
In 2011 William Talbott worked at the Institute on the invitation of Professor Matthias Lutz-Bachmann and the Cluster of Excellence »The Formation of Normative Orders«. He worked on the topic: »What is Moral Progress? How is it possible?«.
In 2019, he is a member of the research project »Complexity in Scinece, Culture and Society« funded by the aventis foundation.

Scholarly profile of William Talbott


Homepage:
Please find more information about William Talbott here.

Main areas of research:
Social and Political Philosophy, Ethics, Philosophy of Law, Epistemology, Philosophy of Human Rights, Rational Choice Theory

Selected publications:
  1. »A Non-Probabilist Principle of Higher-Order Reasoning«, In: Synthèse, No.193, 2016.
  2. »A New Reliability Defeater for Evolutionary Naturalism«, In: Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, 2016. (doi: 10.1111/phpr.12338)
  3. The Reliability of the Cognitive Mechanism: A Mechanist Account of Empirical Justification, New York: Garland Publishing, 1990. (Republished: Oxon: Routledge; 2015.)
  4. »Human Rights, Human Dignity, and Hypothetical Consent«, In: Matthias Lutz-Bachmann and Amos Nascimento (eds.), Human Rights, Human Dignity, and Cosmopolitan Ideals, 2014.
  5. Human Rights and Human Well-Being, Oxford University Press 2010.
  6. »Bayesian Epistemology«, In: Edward N. Zalta (eds.), The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Fall 2001 Edition; Revised March 2008. (URL = http://plato.stanford.edu/archives/fall2001/entries/epistemology-bayesian/)
  7. Which Rights Should Be Universal?, Oxford University Press 2005.
  8. The Reliability of the Cognitive Mechanism: A Mechanist Account of Empirical Justification, New York: Garland Publishing 1990.

Further academic activities:
Member of the Steering Committee of the Center for Human Rights, University of Washington